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Impact@Huntsman

Huntsman School of Business faculty are actively engaged in many and varied research endeavors. This research is typically subjected to rigorous peer review processes leading to initial publication in leading academic journals. Contemporary academic publication style necessarily focuses on methodology, data, and statistical findings. While essential to document and support research, it is sometimes difficult for the business community to access and interpret the significance of a particular research finding.

With the foregoing in mind, Impact@Huntsman is our attempt to share research findings of Huntsman faculty in a more reader-friendly format.  We hope this will result in the transfer of discovery and knowledge to our many students, alumni, friends, and beyond.

We encourage interested readers to reach out to faculty members who have shared their work herein. They are anxious to share ideas and expand their own horizons by meaningful interaction with the broader business community.

News

New USU Huntsman Research Explores Why Employees Retaliate Against Hostile Customers and How Companies Can Prevent It

New USU Huntsman Research Explores Why Employees Retaliate Against Hostile Customers and How Companies Can Prevent It

A waiter spitting in a rude restaurant-goer’s food, a service counter worker giving false information to a belligerent customer, a retail employee snubbing an angry shopper. When customers are harsh or overly aggressive, reacting with retaliation and sabo...

Management Faculty and Students Win Teaching Award

Management Faculty and Students Win Teaching Award

A teaching case written by Professor Mike Dixon and graduate students Luis Armenta and Justin Canova was recognized as the 2018 Best Teaching Case by the Decision Sciences Institute. The case ‘America First Credit Union: High-Quality Transactions and Cust...

Why are There Fewer Women CEOS? Media Seek Answers from USU

Why are There Fewer Women CEOS? Media Seek Answers from USU

A national conversation about the roles and rights of women in the workplace has continued for years, providing lots of material for two Utah State University researchers who’ve long studied the issue of gender diversity. A series of headlines over the la...

Dr. William F. Shughart II Publishes Article on TheHill.com on Why Daylight Saving Time Costs More Than It's Worth

Dr. William F. Shughart II Publishes Article on TheHill.com on Why Daylight Saving Time Costs More Than It's Worth

Excerpt from TheHill.com – “Since California voters mandated daylight saving time (DST) in 1949, considerable evidence has accumulated that shifting clocks back-and- forth twice each year has significant economic costs. Because the human body’s circadian ...

Tracy Livingston, CEO of NuLife Energy and Founder & Chairman of Wasatch Wind, to Speak at Special Screening of USU Huntsman School of Business’s Award-winning Wind Energy Documentary

Tracy Livingston, CEO of NuLife Energy and Founder & Chairman of Wasatch Wind, to Speak at Special Screening of USU Huntsman School of Business’s Award-winning Wind Energy Documentary

October 17, 2018 – Tracy Livingston, NuLife Energy CEO and founder and Chairman of Wasatch Wind, will speak at Utah State University’s Jon M. Huntsman School of Business following a special screening of Wind Uprising, an award-winning documentary about th...

Professor Aaron Brough Featured in EcoWatch

Professor Aaron Brough Featured in EcoWatch

Last year, Aaron R. Brough of the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University and James E.B. Wilkie of Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame carried out seven experiments with 2,000 participants from the US and China,...

Dr. Merideth Thompson featured in The New York Times

Dr. Merideth Thompson featured in The New York Times

While these inclinations of anger and revenge are understandable, that doesn’t mean they’ll do us any good. In reality, they’re more likely to just make things worse. That feeling of motivation to “get even” can tether you to the past in a way that oversh...

 Can Positive Office Relationships have Negative Effects?

Can Positive Office Relationships have Negative Effects?

New research by Utah State University Huntsman School of Business Professor Julena Bonner finds that when employees have a good relationship with their supervisor, they are more likely to model the supervisors’ morally questionable behaviors.

Professor Aaron Brough Featured on NPR and Scientific American

Professor Aaron Brough Featured on NPR and Scientific American

Excerpt from NPR – “The main takeaway from this study is that there's a widespread stereotype that people hold, both men and women, that eco-friendly behaviors are feminine. And because of that, men are sometimes reluctant to go green because they want to...

Huntsman Scholars Help High School Students

Huntsman Scholars Help High School Students

The inaugural Huntsman Scholar Leadership Lab didn't take place on campus in Logan. Instead, 50 Huntsman Scholars traveled 430 miles south to Whitehorse High School in San Juan County, Utah. The goal was to introduce the high school students to the myriad...