Magazine News Blogger

Fall 2007

Faculty and students read Huntsman Book

News reports of scandal, fraud and corruption might lead some to believe that such elements are unavoidable evils that come with success in the business world.

Not according to Jon M. Huntsman.

"Winners Never Cheat: Everyday Values We Learned as Children (But May Have Forgotten)"
"Winners Never Cheat: Everyday Values We Learned as Children (But May Have Forgotten)"

His book "Winners Never Cheat: Everyday Values We Learned as Children (But May Have Forgotten)" is required reading this year. Jon Huntsman is chairman and founder of the Huntsman Corporation. Huntsman founded the company with his brother, Blaine, in 1970. By the year 2005 when it went public, it had become the world's largest privately held chemical company with more than $12 billion in annual revenues.

Last July the Huntsman Corporation announced that Hexion Specialty Chemicals planed to buy the firm for $10.6 billion, a deal that will include the assumption of debt. The transaction must first be approved by Huntsman shareholders and receive regulatory approval in the United States and Europe.

The book promotes basic values such as keeping your word, being gracious and playing by the rules. Huntsman speaks from experience and offers clear and direct insight such as this: ". . .in the winner-take-all atmosphere of today's marketplace, shortcuts to success, at least initially, are alluring, and lying often can be lucrative. That said, scammers, cheaters, spitball pitchers, shelland- pea artists, and the like historically have never prevailed for long. And when their fall does come, it is fast, painful, and lasting."

Dean Douglas D. Anderson said the book was selected because its message is not only key to what the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business is trying to teach but is a wake-up call to a business world that in many cases seems to have forgotten basic lessons that were once commonly understood.

"The book's message is powerful because it is coming from someone who has demonstrated in his life and business dealings the value of integrity," Anderson said. "Jon Huntsman has earned financial success and done so without sacrificing his own values on the road to the top."

Comments may be sent to the editor of the BottomLine, Steve Eaton, at steve.eaton@usu.edu.