Huntsman Alumni Magazine

Fall 2007

The Shingo Prize changes its name, charts new course

"The Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence." Most people probably won't even notice the change in our name. This time last year we were The Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing. Much has happened since then and the name actually reflects a dramatic change in our scope.

On July 1, I was named executive director of The Shingo Prize organization by Dean Douglas D. Anderson. Utah State University is the home of The Shingo Prize and has been for nearly 20 years.

We will continue to support a philosophy called "lean" that emphasizes the importance of showing respect for employees, while eliminating waste, saving money, increasing productivity and improving quality. The approach was originally articulated by Shigeo Shingo, a widely-respected industrial engineer in Japan whose teachings have been key to Toyota's success. In 1988, Shingo came to Utah State University and was recognized with an honorary doctorate in business. It was soon afterward that the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business launched The Shingo Prize for Manufacturing Excellence.

The new name for The Shingo Prize reflects a world-wide expansion of lean principles and systems of management into organizations of all kinds, not just manufacturing companies. We intend to work more closely with the health care industry where there is strong interest in the kind of results lean can deliver.

The Shingo model has been updated to provide universal application to all organizations and may be applied at the individual unit or at the enterprise level. This important strategic shift will dramatically expand our scope of influence since other countries such as Canada, Australia, South Korea, India and the United Kingdom have expressed strong interest in having The Shingo Prize active in their countries. This is good news for the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business .

The foundation for application of lean principles in any organization is education. Because of its unique position as the host organization for The Shingo Prize, the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business will strengthen its collaboration by building a strong educational offering of lean products, not only for our undergraduate and graduate students, but also for the many companies eager to learn how to apply these lean principles as espoused by Dr. Shingo.

We envision companies from all over the world coming to Utah State University, either physically or electronically, to receive the skills and competencies they need to compete in the 21st century. We anticipate that these educational associations will provide numerous valuable opportunities for many of our faculty and students.

Recently, The Shingo Prize conducted its 19th Annual Conference in Jacksonville, Florida, where 12 world-class organizations received this most prestigious recognition. Nearly 600 people attended the conference, by far the largest audience yet, demonstrating the growing respect The Shingo Prize is receiving around the world. Included in the list of distinguished speakers was the Sheriff of the City and County of Jacksonville, where they are using lean to improve quality and reduce the cost of services they provide. Additionally, a dentist presented a working office simulation (dental chairs and all), demonstrating how the application of lean principles have led to incredible improvements in productivity and customer service. Together, these two were dubbed "the world's first lean sheriff and dentist." They are both now in high demand as speakers and consultants.

On July 15, The Shingo Prize Board of Governors unanimously affirmed almost every recommendation brought to them by The Shingo Prize staff. Clearly, this is a new day for The Shingo Prize. We are grateful that we can build on the strong foundation created over the past 20 years by Dr. Ross Robson. In the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business , we are more excited than ever about the strategic role The Shingo Prize will play in our successful future.

The Shingo Prize Board of Governors, beginning back row left to right: Jack Helmboldt, Denso Manufacturing; Paul Brent, Delphi Corporation; Dave Nelson, HTC Global; Rusty Patterson, Raytheon Company; Tim Costello, Builder Homesite, Inc; Jerry Bussell, Medtronics; Harold Simon, O.C. Tanner; Doug Carlberg, M2 Global Technology; Virgilio Del Bosque, Cydsa, Corporativo; Carl Thor, JannettThor International; Chris Fawson, Utah State University; Cliff Ransom, Ransom Research, Inc; David Logozzo, Lean Enterprise Partners; Bruce Hamilton, Greater Boston Manufacturing Partnership, Inc; George Koenigsaecker, Lean Investments, LLC; Robert Miller, The Shingo Prize (USU); and Douglas D. Anderson, USU Jon M. Huntsman School of Business .

Paul Brent, Delphi Corporation; Dave Nelson, HTC Global; Rusty Patterson, Raytheon Company; Tim Costello, Builder Homesite, Inc; Jerry Bussell, Medtronics; Harold Simon, O.C. Tanner; Doug Carlberg, M2 Global Technology; Virgilio Del Bosque, Cydsa, Corporativo; Carl Thor, JannettThor International; Chris Fawson, Utah State University; Cliff Ransom, Ransom Research, Inc; David Logozzo, Lean Enterprise Partners; Bruce Hamilton, Greater Boston  Manufacturing Partnership, Inc; George Koenigsaecker, Lean Investments, LLC; Robert Miller, The Shingo Prize (USU); and Douglas D. Anderson, USU Jon M. Huntsman School of Business .